Communism Kills: a book review of “How Do You Kill 11 Million People?”

How Do You Kill 11 Million People? Why The Truth Matters More Than You Think by Andy Andrews

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


When individuals let truth slide, people die.

This is Andy Andrews’ answer to the question: what happens to a society that lives with lies?

First, he differentiates the past from history

“…the past is what is real and true, while history is merely what someone recorded.”

Then he throws the Nazi systemic mass murder of 11 million people at you as a case study.

In just 47 pages, the reader is lead through logic, shocking facts, and sad truths. The entire book can be read in under an hour (he claims 15 minutes but if you are thinking, taking notes, and getting your mind blown, it will take longer).

It is nonpartisan, direct, and sensible. He doesn’t tell you what to think or point fingers.

In just 47 pages, the reader is lead through logic, shocking facts, and sad truths. The entire book can be read in under an hour (he claims 15 minutes but if you are thinking, taking notes, and getting your mind blown, it will take longer). It is nonpartisan, direct, and sensible. He doesn’t tell you what to think or point fingers.

Good book. Everyone from high school and up should read and discuss it. Andrews could have used a wider variety of sources, but he wanted a focused, simple message. And he encourages the reader to seek information for herself. A reader guide is included.

Related points not in the book:

  1. It only takes a small portion of any group to make change (<10% of Germany’s population were directly involved in The Final Solution). Inspiring and Scary.
  2. Prior to 1919, Germany was a small, but better educated version of the modern United States, according to Benjamin Carter Hett in The Death of Democracy: Hitler’s Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic.

Weimar Germany was characterized by:

  • active feminist movement (women voting, abortion)
  • prominent gay rights movement
  • gender equity
  • modern democracy
  • height of art, architecture, design, movies, music, and literature
  • science center (world leader in chemicals and pharmaceuticals)
  • international leader in the automotive industry

It could have been us

This could describe the United States. What does that tell you? Anyone can become a Holocaust country. So how did Germany get there? That is the eleven million lives question.

My library acquired this book in 2012. I am only the third borrower in the past three years and the copy looks alarmingly pristine. Hopefully, your library’s copy will travel widely and often.

Act

Read the book.

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